Conserving the Nation’s Natural Treasures

Theodore Roosevelt pic

Theodore Roosevelt
Image: nps.gov

Amita Vadlamudi possesses over three decades of experience as a computer systems engineer. In addition, Amita Vadlamudi pursues a number of interests, including fitness, volunteerism, and history. She particularly enjoys learning about American history.

The 26th president of the United States, Theodore Roosevelt is known as an early champion of conservation efforts. Unlike many of his contemporaries who were pursuing industrial growth at an unprecedented rate, Roosevelt recognized that the nation’s natural resources were not inexhaustible and needed to be protected and used in a wise manner.

Because of this belief, Roosevelt created five national parks during his presidency, thereby doubling the number already in existence. He also signed the Antiquities Act, making national treasures such as the Grand Canyon in Arizona and the Natural Bridges in Utah national monuments. In an effort to conserve the nation’s forests for continued use, he also turned 100 million acres of land into national forests. In all, he is credited with protecting about 230 million acres of public land.

Later, in 1916, Woodrow Wilson established the National Park Service, which unified the management of federal parklands. After 100 years, the National Park Service continues to protect the nation’s natural treasures, ensuring that generations to come can enjoy the beauty of the land.

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