Tagged: Ancient

The Central Asian Plains’ Ancient Oxus Civilization

 Oxus Civilization pic

Oxus Civilization
Image: discovermagazine.com

Amita Vadlamudi served as an IT professional for more than 30 years, undertaking large-scale engineering projects spanning Unix and mainframe systems and performing complex coding assignments. An avid reader of history books, Amita Vadlamudi is particularly interested in ancient cultures.

Beyond the ancient Greeks, Sumerians, and Egyptians, there were a number of early advanced cultures whose accomplishments have largely remained a mystery. These include the Oxus civilization, who lived on the Central Asian plains 4,000 years ago.

Spanning 1,000 square miles in what is now Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, and Afghanistan, the civilization was concurrent with the emergence of complex societies along the Yellow, Indus, Nile, and Tigris-Euphrates rivers.

The civilization was named Oxus, after the Amu Dar’ya River, which at the time was known as the Oxus River. Bronze Age sites reveal distinctive art forms and regularly proportioned thick-walled mud brick structures that indicate a level of advancement previously thought to have reached the region 1,000 years later. A major find of the late 20th century that has generated significant interest is a 350-by-600-foot citadel in Gonur that was surrounded by towers and a high wall, and had canals and an irrigation system in place.

Advertisements

The Ancient Wollemi Pine

 

Wollemi Pine pic

Wollemi Pine
Image: wollemipine.com

Amita Vadlamudi is an IT veteran with more than 30 years of experience. Amita Vadlamudi also has a wide range of interests ranging from astronomy to the world of plants.

One of the most important discoveries in the plant world in recent times is the Wollemi Pine. In 1994, New South Wales National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS) officer David Noble was on a hiking trip in the Wollemi wilderness of the Blue Mountains, a forest found 150 kilometers west of Sydney, Australia. The Wollimi wilderness is the most inaccessible area in the rugged mountains. It has over 400 plunging canyons.

As he hiked along, Noble noticed a group of unfamiliar-looking trees thriving in a deep rainforest canyon. The trees had barks resembling bubbles of chocolate and were up to 38 meters in height. He gathered some leafage and had them examined at NPWS and the Royal Botanical Gardens Sydney.

What Noble discovered was eventually called Wollemia nobilis (or Wollomi Pine), belonging to an ancient family of trees. In the world of botany, it was the equivalent of finding a living dinosaur. The tree was prevalent in the southern hemisphere forests for over 100 million years. Around 2 million years ago, dramatic climate change caused their demise.

It was astonishing how a very small number of the pines were found relatively close to a major city. A project was launched in the mid 2000s to commercially propagate and sell the pines to ensure their survival.